Documents released Thursday by the Valley Transportation Authority reveal Samuel Cassidy was involved in an escalation of run-ins with management and fellow employees over the years before he killed nine co-workers last month. Here are excerpts of his employee records during his two decades at VTA:

2001

Jan. 29, 2001 — Cassidy hired at VTA as electro-mechanic at $22.25 an hour. Notation in file that Cassidy takes Effexor for depression.

2005

May 19, 2005 — Cassidy files claim about swollen knee injury from unloading jacks and lifting pads and metal spacers.

Dec. 27, 2005 — VTA sends letter to Cassidy, out on medical leave, reminding him he needed to keep in touch with managers every two weeks.

2010

Oct. 10, 2010 — Cassidy files industrial injury claim after dropping a sharp tool and cutting his wrist.

2014

Jan. 13, 2014 — Cassidy is promoted to substation maintainer with hourly wage of $44.84

2019

July 16, 2019 — Email outlines how Cassidy refused to sign a form checking out a portable radio, which is considered “a critical piece of safety equipment required of his duties.” Cassidy was “removed from service …for insubordination.”

July 18, 2019 — An email from management to an unnamed union representative states that “in order to get Samuel back to work” the union rep would have to sign the radio check-out for Cassidy, and reiterated that the union rep would “work with labor relations on a long term solution for this issue.” They agreed that Cassidy would not be paid for the time he was removed, but that “no discipline would be pursued for this incident.”

2020

Jan. 29, 2020 — Cassidy has a “verbal altercation,” including shouting and finger-pointing for two to three minutes with a female coworker over the vacation schedule. Names are redacted in the document. But in it, Cassidy accuses an unnamed person of being “the most corrupt person at the VTA,” according to emails. Union reps present at the time told Cassidy “this was not the time or the place.” Later, another person in the room told the female coworker: “He scares me,” referring to Cassidy. “If someone was to go postal, it’d be him.” An email about the incident ends with the manager asking “please let me know what next steps will be, if any.”

Feb. 4, 2020 — Management email responds, saying that Cassidy “does not have anything in his disciplinary history that would seem to be of any concern at this point to investigate further. I believe this is something we can refer back to Sam’s management to address with him.”

Feb. 5, 2020 — A management email says that the VTA’s Office of Civil Rights will “not take any further action at this time” but directs Cassidy’s managers to document and go over VTA’s policies on conduct and retaliation. (If this meeting with Cassidy took place, there is no documentation in the file.)

July 16, 2020 — In an email, Cassidy, who filed medical leave paperwork for foot surgery, snapped at human resources after being asked to go back to his doctor to fill in a missing date. “I flat out refuse to do that… I am not making a trip down to see the doctor for this minor detail. I consider this harassment.” (The issue was resolved when the VTA employee asked the doctor to fax the information.)

Oct. 21, 2020 — In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, Cassidy and two other workers refused to attend “mandatory, job specific training” for CPR, according to emails. Cassidy also refused to take a recertification class for Light Rail, telling a supervisor that if kids can’t be in classrooms, he shouldn’t either. In an email, an unnamed union rep called Cassidy a “a hard-working employee. He has refused to attend this class because of COVID threat.” Cassidy ultimately took the training, one-on-one, in early 2021.

Nov. 28. 2020 — In radio communication heard by others, Cassidy expresses frustration that he was unable to sign in with his badge because the terminal wasn’t working. He stated, “So I’m scheduled to work today, but I’m going to go home. If VTA can’t have a system for an employee to badge in, then I’m just going to go home. This is my normal work day. You can put me down as unexcused leave,” according to emails on the subject. When a Rail Controller requested that Cassidy discuss this over a landline, Cassidy responded, “Negative, I’m just going home right now.” In an email, a manager said that this was “considered unnecessary radio traffic and should not be transmitted on an open line for multiple employees to hear.”

2021

Feb 9, 2021 — Cassidy blows up a second time on his portable radio when he was trying to reach someone and didn’t hear a response. In an email, a manager says that Cassidy “communicated unprofessionally and unnecessarily on the radio”  and requested that someone “make sure this situation is addressed in a timely manner.”

Feb. 10, 2021 — A manager’s email says that “Sam was counseled on his code of conduct. Just to remind and reiterate on our agreement/conclusion, this behavior by Sam must never be repeated again. Any similar violation will lead to disciplinary action.”

Feb. 10, 2021 — Cassidy responds in an email from his iPhone, saying, “My actions did not arise from a vacuum. This was a response due to an abuse of authority by the WPS operations manager, who did not post the vacation sign-up, which led to it being canceled. Abuse grows in the dark, my intent was to bring that abuse to light by being vocal about it so others are aware of it.”

May 26, 2021 — Cassidy goes on a shooting spree after reporting to work, killing nine coworkers and himself.

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